Peacock Green Milkpainted Antique Dresser with Agate and Brass Pulls

Just for fun, while I dragged my heels finishing up some tedious touches on one project, I did a (supposedly) quick project. I had previously stumbled upon, and brought home, the perfect dresser for some milk paint, which I have been yearning to use for some time. This one was in great structural condition, so all it needed were cosmetic improvements. Here it is:

Dull, brown dresser with potential.
Dull, brown antique dresser with potential.

I always sand and prep every piece carefully. I didn’t want any chipping with this one, so I also added the bonding agent. I’m convinced that this material is just watered down polyurethane, but I’m not a chemist and they don’t list the ingredients on the bottle.

I used Peacock, from The Real Milk Paint Company. I enjoy the lights, darks, and striated colors of milk paint mixed from pigments and powders. When I have an actual antique (not just vintage) piece, it’s my paint of preference.

It took many coats because I mistakenly sanded through the finish down to raw wood around the original pulls, which had cut large circular patterns in the wood that I knew would show when I used different pulls. When you don’t sand evenly with milk paint, it soaks in differently and becomes very obvious. Drat. At one point, I had to cover the whole thing with flat polyurethane to get an acceptable even finish with several more coats.

When the piece looked done, I coated the whole thing with tung oil. This brings out more color in the paint, and enriches it. The drawers were sanded and sealed inside, and the great steel casters were rubbed with a little gold wax. Then I put on the jewelry: green and yellow agate pulls from Anthropologie. Those are what this piece is about, anyway.

Anthropologie Agate Pulls
Anthropologie Agate Pulls
Peacock Green Milkpainted Antique Dresser
Peacock Green Milkpainted Antique Dresser

See the striations? That’s what I like about Milk Paint.

Looking like a chameleon--changing in different lighting!
Looking like a chameleon–changing in different lighting!

A few spots did chip, so I ended up sanding those back a bit and reapplying the paint and the oil. It’s a very relaxed, very livable look with a pop of glam in the fascinating brass mounted agate pulls.

Available in my Etsy shop.

Advertisements

Bohemian White Antique Buffet with Large Brass Acanthus Leaf Pulls

This dated mahogany behemoth came to me from a CL seller in Ybor City. It had promise. However, the guy had taken the back off (and threw it out) and drilled cord holes in the drawers for media equipment. Not an unusual use, but he seemed to think that “feature” added value. Um, no, just work. The huge hole in the top was also a minus.

The Mahogany Behemoth
The Mahogany Behemoth

Once I simplified it, removing all the little 1920’s wood spool-like decorations, and that cow skull shaped veneer shield on the door fronts, I knew I had the perfect hardware to glamorize it: cut-glass round knobs from Anthropologie, with the most amazing large acanthus leaf brass pulls I bought (eight of them!) at a vintage market some months ago.

This buffet is so big that white seemed to be the most fitting color, especially with the glass and brass thing going on. White allows the simplicity of the piece to show. The lovely details–turned legs ending in stylized feet, the subtle routings, and the backsplash pediment–all stand out better. See for yourself.

White Antique Buffet with Acanthus Pulls and Anthropologie knobs
White Antique Buffet with Acanthus Pulls and Anthropologie Knobs

White Antique Buffet with Acanthus Pulls 2

DSC_2278

DSC_2279

DSC_2277

The insides of the cubbies are painted dark grey. A water-based satin finish thoroughly protects the new paint, and gives this buffet the subtle sheen that complements the bohemian look. Check it out in my Etsy shop.

Join me on facebook; comment there if you’d like. Does anyone read blogs anymore?

Henredon Campaign Dresser and Nightstands: Sapphire Blue Vintage Gems

I picked up these gems more than two years ago, and squirreled them away until I had a vision, and the tools, workspace and ability to carry out that vision. I’ve been painting furniture for more than half my life (not necessarily for pay), but, as we see elsewhere in society, technology has been evolving super fast even in the furniture painting realm, over the last few years. And, actually, campaign pieces have become very desirable now in the vintage furniture world as well. Which is to say that I might have been a little ahead of my time when I picked these up. This happens from time to time; I discovered gray many years ago, and it really now has taken over beige and brown as a neutral. But I digress.

IMG_1595

This is how the set looked. Hard to believe that brown/black look was lovely in anyone’s bedroom. But hey, remember the 1970’s? My sister and I had a lovely orange/red/yellow shag area rug in between our rainbow comfortered twin beds. This set, as is, would have gone just fine with that, except that the oak veneer was chipping in too many places. Whomever owned this thought so little of it they shipped it off to the thrift store, where I spied it.

Don’t forget, we are talking about Henredon here. Lasting, classic, quality, albeit in need of cosmetic repair. Did they know, when they made this set, that the design would be coming back around? Campaign furniture in the 1970’s was made not for portability and stackability, as it had originally been designed for war campaigns, but to evoke the feeling of luxurious travel, as it was also formerly used, with porters taking the pieces by the recessed side handles and loading them onto trains bound for destinations where everyone wore white in the hot sun and fanned themselves with palm fronds. Interesting to imagine. But again, I digress. Vintage campaign style furniture today is just plain hot.

The color? Blue. It had to be blue. Navy? Royal? A little of both? Yes. Satiny? No. Shiny? Yes. A gazillion coats later, in a fairly non off-gassing water-based clear coat, the sapphire blue shines almost as brightly as the gleaming brass hardware–all 14 3-piece pulls, 12 L-brackets, 12 sabots (feet), and 72 tiny escutcheon pinheads: delacquered, cleaned, polished, buffed, and relacquered (Mr. City Girl was a little concerned about my brain cells). A bench buffer became a necessity.

Henredon Campaign Dresser and Nightstands

Now that it is done, does this bedroom set evoke an era of luxurious travel? An era of military campaigns? I don’t know, but I feel that it has never looked better.

Henredon Campaign Dresser2

Henredon Campaign Nightstands

Thanks for reading. If you have comments, I’d love to read them on my City Girl Arts facebook page. It’s public, and you don’t have to be on facebook or friend me to visit me there (But if you click “like”, then my posts will be in your feed). Just click the link, and you’ll also find out where to purchase these charmers, or any of my other pieces. At the moment, they are available in my shop: City Girl Arts on Etsy. Ooops, not anymore :)–they went to live in a nice condo with a politician in Miami Beach.

 

Diamond Dresser Redo: Soulless to Striking

I spied him from a little ways away. I approached. My heart started beating a little faster. Out of the corner of my eye, I noticed his brother lurking in the corner, and my blood pounded in my ears. They did not notice me. In fact, the taller one seemed to be soaking in some attention from an older woman poking and prodding him. “Get away from him,” I thought. “He’s mine. So is his brother.” She left abruptly, so I hurried over to check him out. He looked so fine, even if he had a yellowish aged pallor! Tall, well-built, and nicely cut, he and his shorter, wider brother came from a fine house: Fancher Furniture. And they were waiting for me at the thrift shop! I was giddy with visions.

dressermergeI took their tags over to the counter and paid. These boys were mine! Perfect specimens for remaking! Scratched and dinged, bland coloring, fine bones. I would take their soulless bodies and make them sing! Well, one of them, anyway. The other one is still waiting for his makeover.

Here is the tall one. He has such striking brass hardware all polished up that I needed to paint him a color that would highlight those handles. I named him Midnight Diamond Tall Dresser, and he is really fantastic in person. You should meet him!

Midnight Diamond Tall Dresser Front

Midnight Diamond Tall Dresser drawer pullMidnight Diamond Tall Dresser InsideMidnight Diamond Tall Dresser ring pullMidnight Diamond Tall Dresser SideI think he’ll get along great with so many people. What do you think?